Save Your SharePoint Online Tenant: The SharePoint Sandboxed Solutions Inspector

If you’ve been following the “code-based sandbox solutions on Office 365” saga, you know that there is little time left to fix your existing sandbox solutions in Office 365. See: Microsoft Is Removing Code-Based Sandbox Solutions in SharePoint Online – Be Prepared!

Last week, Vesa Juvonen (@vesajuvonen) released a script (New Script Available from Microsoft PnP: Generate list of sandbox solutions from SharePoint Online tenant) that can help you find your sandbox solutions. Surprisingly, what was missing from Vesa’s script was identification of the solutions that contain code. You’d get a list of all your sandbox solutions, but not specifically the ones that were going to cause you problems.

The Rencore Team

Some of the great looking folks at Rencore. Where’s Waldek?

My awesome friends at Rencore – the SFCAF folks – were kind enough to make a free tool available this week to help with even more with your diagnosis and even some of the cures. In Erwin van Hunen’s (@erwinvanhunenpost Introducing the Rencore SharePoint Sandboxed Solutions Inspector, you can learn more about the free tool and how it can help.

On August 31st, 2016 Microsoft is going to shut down support for Sandboxed Solutions with code.

Sandboxed Solutions containing code will be deactivated and this might impact your Office 365 tenant big time!

If you know you need it, just head right on over to the download page.

The SharePoint Sandboxed Solutions Inspector

They have already released several updates to the tool, and are keeping it current based on feedback from the folks using it. Now that’s service – and for a free tool!

But I think the best thing is that the Rencore tool can fix some of the most common issues – most notably the “empty DLL” issue that makes Office 365 think you have code in your sandbox solution when you don’t.

We heard “30 days” when all this started, and now people seem to be taking that as August 31. Don’t leave your users in the lurch – get going on handling this situation.

Oh, and if you’re a vendor or consultant who has written a sandbox solution with code over the last few years: reach out to your client and own it. Get them back on the right road and you’ll be the better for it.

Clean report!

Clean report!

Microsoft Is Removing Code-Based Sandbox Solutions in SharePoint Online – Be Prepared!

Though Microsoft announced that sandbox solutions with “code” (this is becoming a more confusing distinction than ever with JavaScript becoming a first class coding citizen!) were deprecated back in 2014, last week’s announcement that sandbox code was being shut off caught many people by surprise.

There was a post that went up last Friday, July 29th, 2016, on the Office Dev Center blog that let us know that they were Removing Code-Based Sandbox Solutions in SharePoint Online. Unfortunately, there’s no date on the post, so quite a few people I shared it with doubted its relevance. But if you go up a level, you can see it was posted on the 29th.

Removing Code-Based Sandbox Solutions in SharePoint Online SharePoint team - Published 07/29/2016

Removing Code-Based Sandbox Solutions in SharePoint Online
SharePoint team – Published 07/29/2016

Here at Sympraxis, we’ve never used Sandbox solutions (client side rulez!), but this quick shutdown seems to be hitting many people hard. I would have thought there would have been  series of reminders, maybe a countdown clock, and some targeted emails to people who are still running this type of solution to help them prepare for the eventuality.

There’s been an active discussion on reddit, confusion in the SharePoint group on Facebook, complaints in the SPYam Yammer network, etc. In other words, the communication either didn’t hit or it hit too late.

Even worse, it seems as though the support people had no idea this was going to happen. As late as last Friday afternoon, this was considered a service issue, with updates coming into the Office 365 Admin Center to explain why it was happening.

Custom Solutions and Workflows - Service degradation

Custom Solutions and Workflows – Service degradation

I really try not to be publicly critical of my friends at Microsoft (I know some of you may find that hard to believe!), but this one could have been handled far better. Microsoft is learning how to be more open, and this is one place where I think they are going to learn some things. There may be good reasons why this shutdown is happening ex post haste, and letting us know what those reasons are would be helpful. With SaaS, whether we like it or not, we’re all riding in the same ship. When it springs a leak, not just the women and children need to know it’s time to head to the lifeboats. And it’s August, when not that many people are running at full steam.

There are clear ways to solve this for your own organization, and good articles explaining how to go about it. But you don’t have a lot of time (we’re hearing as little as 30 days, at least in the rumor mill), so you’d better get cracking!

 

Update 2016-08-01: Check out this post from Dave Feldman (@bostonmusicdave) about getting some non-code solutions to activate: Sandbox Solutions removed from SharePoint Online–Here’s the fix for your Visual Studio developed WSPs to get them to activate. It seems as though the change to SharePoint Online may be blocking some solutions it shouldn’t.

Update 2016-08-02: Apparently, some people are seeing a message like this in the Admin Center. If you aren’t sure if you have sandbox solutions, be sure to check!

MC73347 in the admin center:

We’ve detected that you are using a code-based sandbox solution with your tenant account. Please be advised that we’ve moved forward on our plans to remove code-based sandbox solutions as previously announced in 2014.

As part of the removal process, activation of new code-based sandboxed solutions, as well as updates of existing solutions are no longer available. In approximately 30 days, currently running, code-based sandbox solutions in the SharePoint Online environment will be disabled.

Update 2016-08-03: Be sure to read my follow up post New Script Available from Microsoft PnP: Generate list of sandbox solutions from SharePoint Online tenant

Dear Microsoft: Please Make Modified Dates in Site Contents Reflect Content or Structure Changes Only Again

Looking at the modified values in Site Contents has always been a quick way to recognize where activity has occurred – if it has. Without running any code we can quickly see if a site has been used recently. (It was easier to eyeball this in SharePoint 2007 in the vertical listing than it is in SharePoint 2013+, but that’s a different UI issue – tiles aren’t helpful for every use case.)

Site Contents in SharePoint 2007

Site Contents in SharePoint 2007

Site Contents in SharePoint 2010

Site Contents in SharePoint 2010

For months now, a list no one has touched for over a year on Office 365 might say “Modified 23 hours ago”. It seems as though lists and libraries are being “touched” by some background process(es), changing the modified time incorrectly.

Site Contents in SharePoint 2013

Site Contents in SharePoint 2013

An example would be the site in my Sympraxis Office 365 tenant at https://sympraxis.sharepoint.com/sites/Demos2013/_layouts/15/viewlsts.aspx

On that page, I see a number of lists and libraries that say “Modified 5 days ago”. I know for a fact that I have not modified any of those lists or libraries in quite a long time (at least months) and I’m the only person who would be in there.

False Modification Info

I’ve seen this in multiple tenants on Office 365, so it isn’t just something in my tenant. It’s VERY confusing to end users and brings into question the integrity of the platform.

I’ve been told by support that this is “expected behavior” and has been the case since SharePoint 2013. I believe this should be fixed.

I’ve added two UserVoice items to collect votes on this. It seems to be the best way to get some people in Redmond to pay attention to the issue, as my support conduits have failed.

It’s a shame when I feel I need to become an agitator to get  my friends out Seattle way to pay attention to this sort of issue. I know they are better and smarter than this, but large companies sometimes end up with processes that aren’t conducive to absorbing input. Things are SO much better in Redmond now, and I am sincerely enjoying working with the Product Group out there as an MVP.

In this case, let’s politely and constructively let them know this matters to us (and in my case, to my clients) by voting for the UserVoice items. Requests with more votes get more attention. so let’s let them hear us.

Today the SharePoint Mobile App Comes to iOS

One of the big May 4th announcements comes true today, with the release of the Microsoft SharePoint app on iOS. (Yes, we iPhone folks get to have most of the fun!) Read all the details about the release on the Office Blogs.

In case you missed the details, the Microsoft SharePoint app for iOS puts “your Intranet in your pocket” – though it’s probably more useful in your hand. Here are a few views of the app from the Office Blogs post. 
SharePoint appThe version they’ve release today looks a little bit different than the May 4 screenshots, but the basics are all there: Sites, Links, and People. I expect we’ll see continuous and rapid improvement on the app going forward, so keep an eye on it!

Learn more about the new SharePoint mobile app in this video, which was released for the May 4 event:

Dear Microsoft: Please Listen to Us About the New Document Library “Experience”

One of the latest hubbubs in the Office 365 world is around the new Document Library “experience”. (I refuse to use the word “experience” in this sort of context without a little sarcasm and some air quotes.)

There’s a new “experience” coming to Office 365 that makes Document Libraries look a lot like the OneDrive browser UI that some of you must use. (I prefer to use a synced folder on my devices to interact with OneDrive – when syncing actually works.)

In case you haven’t see the new “experience” yet, here’s how it goes. Here’s a very simple Document Library in our Sympraxis tenant.

2016-06-16_10-12-36

When you go to a Document Library for the first time after the functionality hits your tenant, you can choose to walk through a Motherhood and apple pie set of intro screens that show why the new experience is swell.

New Document Library "Experience" Prompt

2016-06-16_10-08-59

2016-06-16_10-09-15

2016-06-16_10-09-30

2016-06-16_10-09-43

And after clicking on “Let’s get started”, you see the new “experience”…

2016-06-16_10-11-58

 

Note the small link at the bottom left that lets you switch back to the “classic” view – for now.

The issue isn’t so much the new “experience”. I do think since people hate change, it’ll cause a lot of discomfort in many organizations, especially since it’s roaring into all tenants. In fact, the new capabilities are indeed swell. The issues are around existing customizations to the branding of functionality of Document Library views.

If you’d like to see what’s got people upset about it, you can check out the UserVoice item Allow Javascript customization and CSS branding/theming in the new Document Library Experience. There’s also a very long thread at the Office 365 Network in Yammer about it.

I do think the “Working on it” message in the UserVoice entry should give some hope. Microsoft knows there are issues. If they can’t address them and others like them, the flow to Office 365 will reverse back to on premises. What I think sows a lot of Fear, Uncertainty, and Doubt about this is it feels – yet again – like it could be a slippery slope.

Document Library default views are often built into what amounts to applications, or at least launch pads into application. It can be anything from simply adding some explanatory text in a CEWP at the top of the page (which is, after all, a Web Part Page) to full fledged functionality provided by additions of JavaScript using jsLink, DVWPs, JavaScript, CSS, etc. In many cases, the view page ends up looking little like what it started out as.

There simply has to be a way to keep these view pages in the mix, as considerable investment of time and money have gone into them. One would hope “telemetry” will show many people *choosing* to stick with “classic” (in this case meaning “functional” and “useful”) mode pages, even if all the “Working on it” stuff happens.

What I’m asking for in this post (Are these Dear Microsoft posts of mine merely rhetorical? I hope not.) is for a sincere attempt to hear what the concerns are. There are many times where people are feeling like a change to something new risks removing some of the exact reasons why the SharePoint platform has been successful in the past. Running Office 365 as a service can indeed be at odds to the successful methods used in Document Libraries, but understanding how to continue the exact patterns of enhancement that were encouraged in the past – by Microsoft- is critical.  Change can be good, but not if it undoes past investment and successful implementation.

I like the image that Brent Ellis (@Brentless) posted in the Yammer thread:

Do No Harm

Software development isn’t medicine, but still…