Create a Subsite in SharePoint 2013 Using REST Calls

Today I was working on what seemed like a simple little task. I wanted to create a subsite using a REST call in SharePoint 2013. I’m not working in an “app” per se – this is for SharePoint 2013 on premises, and I want to do the subsite creation directly from a call in a plain old aspx page.

Unfortunately, there isn’t a clear example out there, at least not that I could find. It seems as though everyone has simply copied the example from this page on MSDN and quotes it verbatim. (Look for the “Creating a site with REST” example.) Unfortunately, I couldn’t get that example to work for me. Most of the examples are also focused on creating subsites in a workflow rather than directly.

I knew I’d need to have a fresh copy of the Form Digest for the request to work. There’s a great article from Wictor Wilén (@wictor) called SharePoint 2013: How to refresh the Request Digest value in JavaScript that explains several different ways to get this token. You must have the token in order for SharePoint to be willing to accept your requests to do a write to anything; it’s a part of the security features. In the page where I am working, we’re building a full application on top of SharePoint, but without using the out of the box SharePoint UI. Because of this, things like the hidden variable which usually holds the Form Digest token aren’t available in our pages. By making a quick call to the ContextInfo REST API, I can grab the Form Digest token pretty painlessly using the second method from Wictor’s post.

The breakthrough came due to some great suggestions from Matt Gibson (@Gibz) and Rob Windsor (@robwindsor) on Twitter. (You’ve got to love the #SPHelp hashtag!) Both Matt and Rob were sure this should work and gave me tips. The winning idea came from Rob. There’s a comment at the bottom of the MSDN page referenced above that shows slightly different JSON data in the REST call payload, and that did it. Bottom line, the documentation doesn’t seem to be adequate or correct in this case. At the very least, I couldn’t find it if it’s out there.

Here’s the code I ended up with. I’ve built it as a jQuery function for reusability.

// Create a new subsite
$.fn.Site.create = function(options) {

  var opt = $.extend({}, {
    siteUrl: null,
    siteName: null,
    siteDescription: "",
    siteTemplate: "sts",
    uniquePermissions: false
  }, $.fn.ProjectName.defaults, options);

  // Because we don't have the hidden __REQUESTDIGEST variable, we need to ask the server for the FormDigestValue
  var rootUrl = location.protocol + "//" +;

  var contextInfoPromise = $.ajax({
    url: rootUrl + "/_api/contextinfo",
    method: "POST",
    headers: {
      "Accept": "application/json; odata=verbose"
    success: function(data) {
      __REQUESTDIGEST = data.d.GetContextWebInformation.FormDigestValue;
    error: function(data, errorCode, errorMessage) {

  // Once we have the form digest value, we can create the subsite
  $.when(contextInfoPromise).done(function() {
      url: rootUrl + "/_api/web/webinfos/add",
      type: "POST",
      headers: {
        "accept": "application/json;odata=verbose",
        "content-type": "application/json;odata=verbose",
        "X-RequestDigest": __REQUESTDIGEST
      data: JSON.stringify({
        'parameters': {
          '__metadata': {
            'type': 'SP.WebInfoCreationInformation'
          'Url': opt.siteUrl,
          'Title': opt.siteName,
          'Description': opt.siteDescription,
          'Language': 1033,
          'WebTemplate': opt.siteTemplate,
          'UseUniquePermissions': opt.uniquePermissions

}; // End $.fn.Site.create

With the function set up this way, I can call it something like this:

  siteUrl: "mysite",
  siteName: "My Site's Name",
  siteDescription: "This is the description that explains how to use this site.",
  siteTemplate: "sts",
  uniquePermissions: false

I like to publish stuff like this when I figure it out. We’re all in this together and we shouldn’t need to figure things out more than once.

Thanks Matt and Rob!