Do You Use Yammer at Work? And Why Not SharePoint?

There was a question a while back on the Microsoft MVPs LinkedIn group (YAFSN! – see below) wondering “Do you use Yammer at work?”

I’m still trying to figure out how much I want to use Yammer. As when Google+ came out, I’m trying it. I pretty much abandoned G+, and Yammer may well go the same way for most things.

I got into Yammer via an invitation into SPYam from Bjørn Furuknap with my USPJA email address. Now I’m trapped into that identity for SPYam (the network for SharePoint discussions that Joel Oleson set up – ping me if you’d like an invitation) but have to use my work email address to access the SharePoint MVP network into which Microsoft has seemingly decided to move all communications. That tying of one’s identity to a single email domain (it seems you can’t combine domains into one über identity) is my biggest beef with the Yammer platform. I’m sure they will work that out, though. (Yammer probably could have done it in a few weeks. Now that it’s a Microsoft product, maybe in Yammer 2016, and you’ll only need to add a three server farm to enable it.)

I read a constant stream of complaints about other aspects of how Yammer works in – natch – Yammer. Sure, there are some true annoyances (no Shift-Enter in post entry, no parity between clients, Adobe Air!) but I could give you a litany of similar annoyances for every single YAFSN. User interfaces seem to always have annoyances. The important thing is how fast the people who develop the platform can react to consistent complaints and improve.

Everyone seems to think we need YAFSN (Yet Another Fantastic Social Network), but each new one that comes along simply fragments the landscape further. Who has the time to check dozens of these damn things? Social in the workplace must be a performance improvement, not a detriment. (I’d argue we should hold our personal social network use to the same standard. LOL catz!) if I have to check four or five social networks constantly in order to be well-informed, that drags down my efficiency.

I’ll keep using Yammer for the MVP stuff because I don’t have any choice, of course. Gotta get all those “secrets” somehow. It really makes me wonder, though, why we don’t use SharePoint to talk about SharePoint. It seems that in the vast majority of cases, SharePointilists prefer to use a different technology to communicate about SharePoint. That, to me, raises a far more important question: “Do you use SharePoint at work?”

Oh, I almost forgot to answer the original question. As a solo practitioner, there’s only me at work, so I don’t really need Yammer. I already have excellent tools in place to enable the voices in my head to converse.

Are Newspapers Really Dead? The Boston Globe Thinks Not

And I don’t think so, either.  I love sitting down with the Boston Globe and finding out what’s going on in the world and locally.  (I am totally at odds with the editorial slant of the Globe, but that’s part of what I enjoy!)  Even better if I can read the Globe lying in the hammock on a beautiful summer day!

Today there was an insert in my Boston Globe promoting a new online option for the Globe: the GlobeReader Preview Edition.  Available to current subscribers for free (at the moment) and built with Adobe Air, it lets you download and take offline a full digital version of the newspaper.

The download and install was painless (not all are) and gosh darn it, the app gives you the paper pretty much as it looks in print.  Of course because it’s on the computer it’s fully navigable, you can adjust font sizes, you can peruse only the pictures, etc.  Of course, you can also print anything you want.  You can also store up to seven days of the paper locally.

Maybe this type of thing will be what saves newspapers.  What do you think?

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