Fun With My Blog Stats

One of the great things about WordPress, and one of the main reasons I switched my blog over from Live Spaces, is the Dashboard.  The statistics that it shows you are really helpful in understanding what you’re writing about that people actually find useful. (Or at least click on.  There’s no beating comments for real feedback.)

I thought it might be interesting for you subscribers out there (and thanks, guys and gals!) to see which of my posts have gotten the most hits since January when I moved over from Live Spaces.  I am constantly surprised by the changes in the rankings.

Top Posts
  1. IE8 and the Internet Explorer Developer Toolbar 152 views
  2. Why Won’t SharePoint Designer Recognize IE8? 108 views
  3. Displaying the First N Words of a Long Rich Text Column with XSL 104 views
  4. “Failed to load the workflow” Message in SharePoint Designer with Vista 99 views
  5. SharePoint Web Services as Data Sources for DVWPs 93 views
  6. Rolling Up Content in SharePoint Using the Data View Web Part (DVWP) 93 views
  7. Error When Trying to Delete a Master Page: “Server error: This item cannot be deleted because it is still referenced by other pages.” 79 views
  8. Rollup Data View Web Parts Revisited 67 views

The first two posts in the above rankings aren’t very pithy at all, but talk about the fact that the IEDT is built into IE8 and an error that I’ve been getting in SharePoint Designer, respectively.  Number 3 is one that I actually am sort of proud of that gives you a nifty little XSL template I wrote.  5, 6, and 8 are posts about the trusty DVWP, which is at the core of my development interests.  4 and 7 are just little workarounds for a couple of SharePoint and Designer issues I had run into.

There are days when I see a really strange bunch of hits on some old, seemingly useless post.  For a few days last week, my post about How to Fix Recurring Meeting Workspace Error: ‘g_InstanceID’ is undefined got a bunch of hits.  I wondered if maybe there was a new hotfix or something that might have caused this error to be triggered in a lot of places, but I didn’t see any indicator for what might have spiked the interest anywhere.

If nothing else, watching my statistics points me to places where I can do some housekeeping.  A lot of my old posts don’t have tags in WordPress because I got lazy after I moved over from Live Spaces.  I also recently learned the cool WordPress trick for displaying source code painlessly from my buddy Pete Sterpe, so if a post is getting a decent number of hits, I’ll go and implement this so that the code can be more easily copied.

Even better is to watch traffic to see what all of you out there in ‘Netland might want to hear more about.  My DVWP stuff consistently gets a good number of hits, and I hope that it is helping folks out there.  I don’t post for vanity or to become famous; I really do want to provide good tips and tricks, if not downright solutions, for those of you who manage to make your way to my blog.  I love developing with SharePoint and I just want to spread the word!

If there’s something that you’re struggling with or something that you’d like me to blog about more, drop a comment on this post and let me know.

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PDF iFilters – Which Is Right For You?

I’ve written about iFilters a little beforeAs defined by Wikipedia,

IFilters are plugins that allow the Windows Indexing Service and the newer Windows Desktop Search to index different various file formats so that they become searchable. Without an appropriate IFilter, contents of a file cannot be indexed.

Surprisingly, for a long time the only 64 bit PDF iFilter which was available was from an outfit called Foxit Software rather than Adobe.  However, last December, Adobe released their own version.

Both do the trick, of course, but your mileage may vary.  Jie Li did a performance comparison between the two (Deb Haldar did the same for the 32 bit versions earlier) and found that the Foxit iFilter was about 5x faster than the Adobe version with his set of PDF documents.  The Foxit iFilter now costs about $329 per dual core server, while the Adobe one is free.  So you should consider what your environment contains and what you’d like to spend.

I would suggest trying both iFilters in a test environment that has a corpus of documents similar to your production environment (an exact copy would be best) and see which works better for you, then decide.  Different document contents, a mix of languages, etc. can change the performance profiles of indexing, so you’d make a better decision based on testing with your own content.

Be sure to follow the installation instructions from start to finish, as there are a few “manual” steps required to update the registry on the server, register the document icon, and such, depending on which iFilter you choose.

SharePoint (MOSS and WSS) Version Numbers

Here is a great post from Spencer Harbar entitled SharePoint 2007 Post SP1 Hotfixes.  In it, Spencer has gone to the immense effort of logging exactly what all of the post-SP1 hotfixes are and what version numbers they represent.  If you need to figure out where your SharePoint farm stands in the update timeline, this post will be of real help.

I’m copying Spencer’s list here as of today just for quick reference, but click on through to Spencer’s post for further updates and some good advice about them as well!

Windows SharePoint Services 3.0
941422 31 January 2008 6300 Request Online Post SP1 Rollup
941653 31 January 2008 6301 Request Online Detailed as a MOSS fix, but actually for WSS
948945 21 February 2008 6303 Request Online  
949399 27 February 2008 6304 Request Online  
949956 17 March 2008 6306 Request Online  
950279 21 March 2008 6307 Request Online  
950484 27 March 2008 6308 Request Online  
952292 12 May 2008 6314 Request Online  
952698 20 May 2008 6315 Request Online CDS Pack
953137 29 May 2008 6316 Request Online Detailed as MOSS, but actually WSS
953484 5 May 2008 6317 Request Online This is *not* a rollup, but is a fix for a
very common issue with Choice columns
953473 5 June 2008 6317 Request Online  
951695 15 July 2008 6318 Request Online Infrastructure Update
955594 22 July 2008 6324 Request Online  
956248 7 August 2008 6324 Request Online AAM & CDS Fixes for IUs
956057 26 August 2008 6327 Request Online August Cumulative Global
957109 26 August 2008 6327 Request Online August Cumulative Local
957691 28 October 2008 6331 Request Online October Cumulative Global
960010 18 December 2008 6335 Request Online December Culm (local and global)
961755 24 February 2009 6341 Request Online February Culm "Uber"
         
         
SharePoint Server 2007
941274 31 January 2008 6300 Request Online Post SP1 Rollup
945089 31 January 2008 6301 Request Online  
942819 31 January 2008 6301 Request Online  
949402 27 February 2008 6304 Request Online  
950132 12 March 2008 6306 Request Online  
949955 17 March 2008 6306 Request Online  
950280 21 March 2008 6307 Request Online  
950292 21 March 2008 6307 Request Online  
950487 27 March 2008 6308 Request Online  
952294 8 May 2008 6314 Request Online  
952704 20 May 2008 6315 Request Online CDS Pack
953471 5 June 2008 6317 Request Online  
953135 26 June 2008 tbc6320 Request Online Excel Services
955144 11 July 2008 tbc6323 Request Online Excel Services
951297 15 July 2008 6318 Request Online Infrastructure Update
955593 21 July 2008 6324 Request Online  
955586 23 July 2008 6324 Request Online  
956056 26 August 2008 6327 Request Online August Cumulative
957693 28 October 2008 6331 Request Online October Cumulative Global
958567 28 October 2008 6331 Request Online October Cumulative Local
958569 28 October 2008 6331 Request Online October Culm DLC Workflow
960011 18 December 2008 6335 Request Online December Culm (local and global)
961756 24 February 2009 6341 Request Online February Culm "Uber"

Importing Blogroll Links into WordPress from an Outlook 2007 OPML Export

If you’d like to import your RSS feeds from Outlook 2007 into your WordPress blogroll, you can use the Tools / Import capability, as outlined in this WordPress support article.  However, when I went to do this, no matter how many times I tried it, it wouldn’t work.

I finally exported my existing blogroll from WordPress and compared the OPML files.  Turns out that you need to do two search and replaces in your Outlook-generated OPML file for the import to work:

  1. Replace all type=”RSS” with type=”link”
  2. Replace all xmlUrl= with htmlUrl=

So, for instance:

<outline text=”Heather Solomon – MVP, WSS – SharePoint Branding and Design”
type=”rss” xmlUrl=”http://feeds.feedburner.com/HeathersBlog”/>

becomes

<outline text=”Heather Solomon – MVP, WSS – SharePoint Branding and Design”
type=”link” htmlUrl=”http://feeds.feedburner.com/HeathersBlog”/>

 

p.s. Yes, I know that all of my links are now to the RSS feeds and not the sites themselves.  All the better to subscribe to!

Carsten Keutmann’s SharePoint Manager 2007

I’ve followed Carsten Keutmann’s blog on and off over the last few years.  When he writes, he writes great stuff.  (Write more often, Carsten!)

I had previously plugged Carsten’s  SharePoint Manager 2007 tool, and he’s released updates to it since I’ve last looked at it.  This is a must-have tool for serious developers.  It lets you explore the object model with a nice Windows-based interface and even make changes to the data.  THIS IS A SERIOUS TOOL.  Don’t try to use it if you don’t understand the SharePoint Object Model very well, as any changes you make could render your application unusable.

Carsten’s description:

The SharePoint Manager 2007 is a SharePoint object model explorer. It enables you to browse every site on the local farm and view every property. It also enables you to change the properties (at your own risk). This is a very powerful tool for developers that like to know what the SharePoint holds of secrets.